NAtional Hellenic Museum

The National Hellenic Museum Hopes to Expand Educational Programming on Greek Culture and History

 

 

CHICAGO - The National Hellenic Museum (NHM) is hoping to expand its educational offerings in the community with free programming about Greek legacy and Hellenic heritage to Greek schools, Sunday schools, and GOYA/JOY groups.“Chicago has one of the world’s largest Greek populations,” said Dimitra Georgouses, Education & Public Programs Manager. “We want to make sure every child of Greek descent has the opportunity to be engaged with programming at the National Hellenic Museum.”

The Museum portrays and celebrates Greek heritage and Hellenic legacy, sparking inquiry and discussion about the broader issues in our lives and communities through educational classes and programs, exhibitions, and events.

It is the first and only major museum in the country dedicated to connecting generations to the legacy of Greek culture, history, and the Greek story in America,  highlighting the contributions of Greece to the American mosaic and inspiring curiosity about visitors’ own family stories though oral history.

 

Education for the whole community is a key component of the National Hellenic Museum’s mission and the Museum is always looking at ways to expand its programs so that classes and lectures about Greek heritage and culture is accessible to all.The Museum’s educational programs are open to students in grades pre-K through 12 and adults. They promote self-awareness and understanding in a diverse world.

 

“Budgetary limitations should not prevent children from being exposed to the core values of Western civilization, such as democracy, justice, arts, and humanities,” said Georgouses. “In our Museum classroom, all children are inspired to reflect beyond today’s headlines about Greece and consider their place in the world and their community; to imagine a future different from the past and to envision themselves as productive and engaged citizens.”

 

The National Hellenic Museum’s classes draw from the Museum’s rich depository of artifacts, oral histories, photos, and historic newspapers, as well as Greek myths, classics, and culture. Students are given the opportunity to act out scenarios for legal trials, taking roles of the judges or jury; or they experiment with mechanics for ancient monuments and learn the role of geometry in construction. Skills such as researching, archiving, interviewing, writing, and starting collections are introduced. “We are so grateful for the opportunity presented by the Hellenic Foundation grant that would allow us to reach so many more students interested in learning about Greek legacy, how they fit in the wider world, and the meaning of their own heritage.”

 

For more information about NHM’s educational programming, call 312-655-1234 or visit www.nationalhellenicmuseum.org.